The Last 10k

The Last 10k

This is about how I’m feeling these days. I can’t even sneak out of bed without waking my daughter lately. There is just no sneak left in me.

I am 36 weeks pregnant: and as a marathon runner, there is something oddly familiar about the feelings that I am going through.

Oh my god. It’s the last 10k of a marathon.

The last one that I ran was Boston. Just like every marathon I have ever ran, for 32.2k, I loved it. But something switches instantly when I pass the 10k to go sign. Something terrible.

I have found some similarities in the last month of pregnancy and the last 10k of a marathon… which I will share with you.

At first I love all the people cheering, saying nice things, high fiving me, yelling “Go Canada!” – they’re so enthusiastic. But at the end, as much as I love them, I resent them and everyone they know. And pretty much everyone who is not running a marathon.

Muscles that I never knew I had ache. I’m a big fan of anatomy but there are certainly less painful and crippling ways to learn it.

I can’t eat anymore. I’m done. Not another gel, not another chew. Nothing. It just takes too much energy.

I’m so profoundly tired and heavy feeling that I can’t hardly lift my feet. Why does anyone run? Ever? I want to eat some chocolate and watch Dumb and Dumber.

But it’s also when the finish line draws near. It’s where you know you will get to the end and things will likely be successful. And it’s a pretty darn exciting time too… if you had muster up the energy to realize it.

Why Wait?

Why Wait?

Waiting. One of the marvellous traits of humanity is that we can learn to enjoy it. I know more than anything, training has helped me to appreciate it as the essence of life.

Every time I do a workout that challenges me, I wait. I wait until I can breathe again, I wait until my muscles regain feeling, I wait until I can stop the torture. And I know that the longer I wait, and the harder it is to wait, the better waiting is.

Training is waiting. You are never living in the body you created today. You are living in the body you created yesterday. Long ago. Someone else’s body. You will not get to reap the strength, power or endurance that you built today. No, you will wait.

I used to hate the taper before a big race. Turning off the beast mode after a chunk of hard training makes the sanest of us crazy. But now I love tapers. The wait. The calm before the storm.

Christmas time is all about waiting. We start it really early around my house and get really wound up. Every day is a count down to the big day. And is the day itself so wonderful? Not really. It’s all about the wait.

We get Christmas every year but I’m probably only going to have two babies. I find I need to remind myself that life is all about the wait, all about the journey, all about enjoying the moment. This is a time I will only have once… the only time my baby can hear my heart beat all the time, and when I can feel her every move.

There’s almost always opportunity in your life to move forward, but sometimes its all about sitting still to truly appreciate where you are.

Happy Holidays!

Baby Doping

I for one can testify that women, OK I, possess inhuman strength postnatally. I ended up gaining 35 pounds and ending my pregnancy putting shame to the term “runner” with my best waddley rendition of what I thought running looked like. I stopped at every port potty, gas station and tree to relieve my aching bladder and the rest of the time bounced around trying to ignore it’s crampy plight. The day Ama came was the first of our Sun Run training clinic. That would have been fine if I was participating, but I was coordinating. How could I miss the first run?

So when my water broke in the car on route, I knew it was going to be an interesting morning. After setting up, I slipped into the vacant stairwell to phone and ask the on-call obstetrician if he thought it would be OK that I go for a run. An old crankity fellow, his answer was as disbelieving as it was direct. “No. No, I don’t think it would be OK.” I went into the delivery room in taxed spandex and a pair of now-one-size-too-small New Balance 890s.

Post-baby I felt like I was dragging a tent trailer everywhere I went. But I kept going. I had a great running group who motivated me and supported me through all those breast-feeding walks and blanket shuffles. Plus, I always had to catch up. So as my fitness came back, it just kept climbing. I ran the Sun Run 3 months postpartum and made the top 100 list. I made attempts at training all summer, never surpassing the 3 hour mark for a long run and only on one occasion surpassing two hours. In 2006 I was in a serious accident that left me on a train of injury after injury. Maybe the imposed low mileage helped keep the injuries at bay. I ran a sub-90 half, and to my surprise, and the surprise of my coach at the time, a 3:09 full. The last 3/4’s was painful – but I kept some sort of pace up.

Many athletes have experienced similar situations. Colleen De Reuck set the world record in the 10-mile postpartum. Magdalena Lewy Boulet dropped her 10k time from 32:40 to 31:28, her half from 1:15 to 1:11 and her full from 2:30 to 2:26 post-baby. Catriona Matthew, a Scottish golfer, won the British Scottish Women’s Only 10 weeks after delivering. Kara Goucher PR’d and came 5th in the Boston five-months postpartum. Shayne Culpepper dropped her 1,500m from 4:08 to 4:05, her 3,000m from 9:17 to 8:54 and her 5k from 15:31 to 15:01 after having a baby. Sara Vaughn took her mile time from 4:58 to 4:11. Derartu Tulu dropped her 5k from 14:50 to 14:44, her 10k from 31:08 to 30:17 and her marathon from 2:30 to 2:23 after child birth. Ingrid Kristiansen won the Houston marathon 5 months after delivery. Of course, famously, Sonia O’Sullivan won silver in the Olympic 5,000m 14 months postpartum.

Of course, there are other unfavourable examples. Paula Radcliffe may have won the NYC marathon nine months after having a baby, but she hasn’t come within her twice bettered world record since child birth.

In fact, there is even a rumour that was humoured during the 1984 International Olympic Committee meeting about Abortion Doping. Apparently there had been some talk of known Eastern European athletes getting pregnant and timing abortions at three months gestation and close to a major competition to gain the positive cardiovascular effects of pregnancy and subsequent performance increases. There is at least one official report of a Swiss doctor being involved. The whole abortion doping story may have evolved from forced abortions in Eastern European athletes that became pregnant due to fears about the birth outcomes of babies whose mothers were on steroids or other performance enhancing drugs. Perhaps even the concern of babies born to mothers who exercised at a high level alone was enough to fuel fear about fetal outcome. Remember, this was a time when female exertion was still thought to be dangerous, forget the effects on a developing fetus. In fact, there were no women’s distance running events in the Olympics prior to the 1980s. However, the potential physiological boosts from pregnancy have been widely acknowledged and the theory that an athlete might “abortion dope” to gain a performance advantage is plausible.

Thank goodness there have been no rumours of the occurrence as of late. But it does shed a light on an interesting question, “Does having a baby make you weaker? Or stronger?”

Of course, there is a plethora of additional reasons beyond the physiological changes of pregnancy. Women may have a raised pain threshold and fearlessness after going through labour. They may find more balance in their life and ascribe less importance to the outcome of races. They may be happier. They may use their training time more efficiently. They may simply be tougher. We always consider relaxin’s* role in decreasing joint stability, but it may also increase mobility and tissue suppleness.

On the flip side though, if women are not taking care of themselves postnatally they put themselves at increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. If they do not take in enough vitamins, minerals and nutrients, they risk depleting their bones. The relaxin puts them at increased risk of soft tissue injury. Extreme fatigue and inattentiveness compounds these risks.

I personally belief that this superwoman lift in performance is a throw-back from when we had to keep up with the tribe. It just makes sense that women would get an edge to help them carry along the tribe’s newest and most critical members. So, postpartum mamas, what’s your take? Has anyone seen a major difference in their abilities postpartum for better or for worse?

*Relaxin is a hormone that is present in high levels prenatally that “relaxes” ligaments to allow the pelvis to expand and open up the birthing path. It continues to be present in the body until 6 months, and even up to a year postpartum. It has a global softening effect on all body tissues.